The poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis. SparkNotes: Wordsworth’s Poetry: “I wandered lonely as a cloud” 2018-12-21

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Analysis of the Poem by William Wordsworth Essay

the poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis

The poet cannot resist himself from participating in the dance of the daffodils. The image of the dance occurs in each of the four stanzas. As he recollects the past emotions in tranquillity, he is creatively inspired to render these emotions flow through his poetic composition. The waves danced too, but they do not produce the glee the daffodils have created. It was first published in Poems in Two Volumes, in 1807. A bunch of daffodils symbolize the joy and happiness of life. British Romantics emphasized the following.


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I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud Analysis

the poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis

He feels great pleasure from it. The poet also says that the daffodils were tossing their heads as if they were dancing in happiness. But its effects can be subtle, , meaning that things can slip even a careful reader by. When the memory of that sight comes into view of the poet, he was able to derive ecstatic pleasure which he had enjoyed actually. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. For three stanzas, the speaker describes a kind of utopia, where peace and joy abound. The poet assumes himself to be a cloud simile floating in the sky.

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A Short Analysis of Wordsworth’s ‘I wandered lonely as a cloud’

the poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis

This picture from nature may seem to depart, Yet the Man would at once run away with your heart; And I for five centuries right gladly would be Such an odd such a kind happy creature as he. The way the speaker attributes his own feelings to parts of nature, shows that he feels one with his surroundings when he is in this place. The title, 'Daffodils' is a simple word that reminds us of the arrival of spring, when the field is full of daffodils. The flowers were visible as far as the poet could see along the shore-line of a bay. In the last line, the poet personifies the flowers by saying that they were fluttering like birds or butterflies and dancing like human beings.

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I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud (Daffodils) Analysis

the poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis

The rhyme is masculine exact with cross rhymes in the first 4 lines followed with the couplet. We know that the speaker is a poet because he tells us so in line 15. He realized that a poet who was susceptible to natural grace could not help but feel happy in the presence of such gay and beautiful flowers. My difficulty came as from a sense of the indomitableness of the spirit within me. Wordsworth, as we all know him for, is considered the greatest romantic poet that used to describe Nature in its very essence and shape. Nature was a guiding force to the romantic poet.

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Poems with Personification: William Wordsworth's Wandered Lonely as a Analysis

the poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis

To fully understand the poem and any William Wordsworth poetry analysis, a brief look at the tenets of British Romanticism is in order. The daffodils are no longer simple yellow flowers in wild growth, but they are of a rich golden hue. At the end, author's heart was content in joining the daffodils' dance. The tone of the poem is dynamic, it changes throughout the poem. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The emotions associated with Wordsworth in this poem, Daffodils is not ephemeral but rather permanent and everlasting.

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I wandered lonely as a Cloud (Daffodils) Summary

the poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis

Daffodils are yellow flowers, having an amazing shape and beautiful fragrance. The dance of the daffodils is akin to creative ecstasy. In solitude, when his mind is unrestrained by disturbing elements of the real world, he revives the memories of the daffodils. William Wordsworth William Wordsworth 1770-1850 has written some of the finest poems on Nature in the English language. Suddenly he could view the large number of daffodils gathered by the side of the lake. The waves beside them danced; but they, Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed-and gazed-but little thought, What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie, In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye, Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills, And dances with the daffodils.

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I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud (Daffodils) Analysis

the poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis

The poet calls daffodils golden rather than yellow in order to express their majesty and beauty. The poem reveals that the speaker feels far more comfortable and peaceful when thinking about the afterlife than he feels at home on his couch in real life. Shining, twinkling and dancing, the flowers exude joy and life that lift the lonely heart of Wordsworth into a state of bliss. The poet, however, could not estimate their number as they spread along extensive sides of the lake. As the poet made an instant glance, he could see myriad of daffodils waving their heads, as if they were rejoicing and dancing out of alacrity. In almost of his poems, Wordsworth described the pure beauty of nature through his gentle words and also conceived that nature as living personality.


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SparkNotes: Wordsworth’s Poetry: Analysis

the poem daffodils by william wordsworth analysis

He imagined that the daffodils were dancing and invoking him to join and enjoy the breezy nature of the fields. The tone of the poem is dynamic, it changes throughout the poem. The reader immediately senses that the speaker has brought him to a Utopia. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. Tossing their heads in sprightly dance - use of personification, daffodils are tossing their heads like humans, expressing their emotion of happiness through dance it gives liveliness to the poem. He gazed at them, hardly knowing what enormous treasure he was accumulating in his mind. Suddenly he could view a large number of daffodils gathered by the side of the lake.

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