How to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary. To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 8 Flashcards 2018-12-22

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Notes on Chapter 8 from To Kill a Mockingbird

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Scout allows him to escort her to his door. Chapter 12 offers the one real window into the life and culture of Maycomb's black community. Rather than congratulating Scout on her knowledge, Miss Caroline believes Scout is being taught incorrectly and tells her not to read at home anymore. They can't understand why Atticus isn't angry at the men who were ready to hurt him and lynch Tom. She even runs over to the Radley house and yells a warning to them. That evening, Scout tells Atticus about her day, hoping that she won't have to go back to school — after all, Burris Ewell doesn't.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 1

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Jem's quest to build a snowman requires some ingenuity on his part. Dubose- whose house they pass everyday. Over the summer, Jem and Scout learn important lessons about race black people don't much like white people; their black cook has a whole life and world of her own , and they also learn that Tom Robinson's been accused of raping a white woman. All three of them are jarred and shaken, yet they carry on with the meeting as though nothing has happened. Slowly, Boo becomes less of a mythical neighborhood monster and more of a kindly recluse. Braxton Bragg Commander of the Confederate Army of Tennessee from the summer of 1862 until the end of 1863. The heat of the fire contrasts sharply with the intense cold, providing an allusion to the sharply defined sides in the upcoming trial and conflict.


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To Kill a Mockingbird: Summary & Analysis Part 1: Chapters 8

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

The boys want to try a back window instead, despite Scout's pleas to leave. Summary For the first time in decades, Maycomb gets snow. Dill goes back to Mississippi for the school year, and Scout turns her attention to starting first grade — something she's been waiting for all her life. While watching the fire, Boo wraps a blanket around Scout, and she doesn't even notice. Miss Maudie is honest in her speech and her ways, with a witty tongue, and Scout considers her a trusted friend. Radley replies that he plugged the knothole because the tree is dying. Scout is then punished by Calpurnia for criticizing Walter's table manners.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 4

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

In their childish innocence, Jem and Scout are surprised to find that only four people in Calpurnia's church can read. When Scout questions Jem about this dichotomy, he becomes very angry and tells Scout never to mention the trial again. In the American South during this time period, segregation was the law. Jem is excited about sixth grade, because he is going to learn about ancient Egypt. Harper Lee's classic novel of modern American literature is one of the most taught books about hero Atticus Finch deals with race relations, segregation and injustice in American South during the Great Depression. They rightly conclude that someone is deliberately leaving gifts for them in the knothole, but they can't understand why this donor won't make himself known.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 1

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Uncle Jack punishes Scout without first hearing her side of the story. Atticus wants the children to understand that courage has to do with the fight for one's personal goals, no matter what the odds are against achieving the goal. When Atticus holds the gun, the fate of the entire community rests upon his shoulders, a role which will be discussed more in Chapter 24, where Miss Maudie points out that the town depends upon Atticus to uphold truth for them all. Despite Atticus' probing questions about Scout's first day of school, she says little. Calpurnia explains that members of the black community prefer to speak their own form of English, which shows that their dialect helps to identify them as a group, an idea which has contemporary reverberations with respect to the issue of introducing Ebonics in American public schools. Dubose is a very mean, sick old lady who sits on her front porch and yells insults at Jem and Scout as they pass by. Scout is slightly ashamed of her father, because it seems like he can't do anything noteworthy.

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How to kill a mockingbird

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

They find two small images carved in soap, of a boy and a girl, that are exact replicas of themselves, a whole packet of chewing gum, a tarnished medal and the biggest prize of all -- a pocket watch on a chain with an aluminum knife. Dill's fascination, in particular, leads to all sorts of games and plans to try and get Boo to come outside. Jem runs into the Radleys' yard and touches the outside of the house. Chapter 6 concludes their second summer with Dill, while Chapter 7 begins Scout's second year of school. In town, Jem buys himself a model steam engine and buys Scout a sparkly twirling baton she has had her eye on for some time.

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To Kill a Mockingbird: To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Flick - and the house was still. He's much older than the parents of her peers, which makes it difficult for him to take part in such activities. Burris Ewell displays the same sort character traits that make his father, Bob Ewell, so dislikable. Though still frightened of him, they wish to befriend him and help him now. Scout's retelling of Jem's description of Boo shows how her young mind could not yet distinguish between fact and fiction.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 8 Summary

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Walter refuses to take the money because his family is too poor to pay it back. In Chapter 4, we see that the schools have attempted to teach children how to behave in groups and how to be upstanding citizens, but Scout notes that her father and Jem learned these traits without the kind of schooling she is getting. They return home and gloomily await Atticus's return, knowing that they will be in trouble. Lee deftly adds to the impact of the respect the African American community has for Atticus by ending a chapter with this action. Dill is a crucial character in the story because he is both an insider and an outsider. The physical representation of this facet of childhood is represented in Jem's daring rush into the Radleys' yard, in which he enters a space that has been fundamentally condemned by the entire town. A patient and loving, if somewhat unusual, father, Atticus acts as the voice of reason for his children, and later the entire town.

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